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The History of Cordoba

The Roman Period

There is very little information about the origin of Cordoba. The first news date to the Bronze period. There was a native place called “Corduba”. Since 206 b.c. when the city was conquered by the Romans under the rule of “Lucio Mario”, Cordoba became an important city, being used as the place where Roman troops had their base. Cordoba was considered then as the unofficial capital of the “Hispania Ulterior”.

It was from the civil wars between Cæsar and Pompey, when Cordoba started going down as a historical city. After Cæsar won the war, Cordoba suffered a big destruction and the population decreased, though it did not loose its previous privileges. After the administrative reforms started by Augustus, Cordoba received the status of Colony, turning into the capital of the newly created “Bética” province. During the first three centuries of the Roman Empire, the city experienced a big push, when it become the capital of the province. There were schools of very high level and some local personalities became Senators at Rome. Cordoba was the center from where official post was sent to the administrative archives. The trade on oil, mineral and agricultural products, acquired a big importance; this was in part due to the construction of the “Via Augusta” (Augusta Boulevard) that passed over the Roman bridge on the “Guadalquivir”, and joined the cities of “Linares” with “Cadiz”, and the “Betica” with the rest of the Hispanic settlements. The most outstanding figure of the Hispanic-Roman Cordoba was “Séneca” (Lucio Anneo Seneca: Hispanic philosopher) who was “Nero’s” teacher.

When the civil war came to an end, Cordoba received the status of Colony, becoming capital of the newly created “Bética” province. During the first three centuries of the Roman Empire, the city experienced a big impulse, it was the most flourishing in Andalusia. There were Schools of high level. This was in part due to the construction of the “Via Augusta” (Augusta Boulevard) that passed over the Roman bridge on the “Guadalquivir”, and joined the cities of “Linares” with “Cadiz”, and the “Betica” with the rest of the Hispanic settlements. They built a wall around Cordoba, as the archaeological ruins demonstrate.

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